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20061001

Walking Through The Valley Of Eden (Sandbox of God Walkthrough Part 1)

Entry 292 posted in: c. The Sandbox Of God


Sandbox of God The Sandbox Of God really is an amazing game. By combining natural phenomena and godly interventions the inhabitants of Earth and their habitat evolve in different ways.

The game travels through 7 chapters, each representing a certain period of our Earth, starting in 1.000.000 years BC and ending in 2100 AD. Depending from the (previous and actual) situation several icons are shown on the screen. Clicking these will trigger some actions.

Some of these actions are pretty straightforward, it is obvious that rain will generate a forest out of a tree and that the same forest will nourish animals and humans, but how on Earth does one create a lake, a volcano or a cave out of a meteor?

The SoG website gave you some hints and then some other before but for those who don't want to experiment with all the settings in the game, or those who are really stuck, here is part 1 of the graphical walkthrough, made by yours truly... simply click the icons in the same order as they have been presented here... (Kudos to John who posted several solutions on Jay Is Games)

This walkthrough is compatible with version 1.56 (August 2010)


F U N  S P O I L E R S  A H E A D

Peace, Love and Eternal Understanding (Sandbox of God Walkthrough Part 1)

This is the toughest part of the game, in which humans and rabbits both get civilised and learn to know each other, though not in the biblical sense of the word. Playing by this walkthrough also takes away most of the fun in the game...

1.000.000 years BC, the coming of man... and rabbits...

Earthquake Tree Man Rain Meteor Rabbits Thunder

Divine Intervention

Scorch Wind

Year 1 AD, the gold it's in the...

Holy Sign Thunderstorm Heat

Do Nothing

Freeze Gold title= Wind

Year 500 AD, farms, plagues and things...

Farmland Rain Gold Rest

Divine Intervention

Plague

Year 1000 AD, have catapult, will shoot...

Holy Sign Silver Rest

Divine Intervention

Thunderstorm Catapult

Year 1500 AD, oil to boil...

Oil Silver Plague Thunder Rest

Divine Intervention

Year 2000 AD, the age of medicine...

Medicine Rest Plague

Year 2100 AD, peace, love and eternal understanding...

Peace Rest

Playing this sequence on a new game gives you the highest god-rank and should brings the checklist to 62.60%.
How to fulfill the other goals will be explained in the following days... if god, dog or blog doesn't forbid...


The complete SoG walkthroughs (updated August 2010):
Walking Through The Valley Of Eden (Sandbox of God Walkthrough Part 1) 
Bad Moon Rising (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 2) 
Under The Vulcano (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 3) 
I Want To Be A Little Fishy (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 4) 
It's the Final Countdown (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 5) 

Bad Moon Rising (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 2)

Entry 293 posted in: c. The Sandbox Of God


Sandbox of God The Sandbox Of God really is an amazing game. By combining natural phenomena and godly interventions the inhabitants of Earth and their habitat evolve in different ways.

The game travels through 7 chapters, each representing a certain period of our Earth, starting in 1.000.000 years BC and ending in 2100 AD. Depending from the (previous and actual) situation several icons are shown on the screen. Clicking these will trigger some actions.

Some of these actions are pretty straightforward, it is obvious that rain will generate a forest out of a tree and that the same forest will nourish animals and humans, but how on Earth does one create a lake, a volcano or a cave out of a meteor?

The SoG website gave you some hints and then some other before but for those who don't want to experiment with all the settings in the game, or those who are really stuck, here is part 2 of the graphical walkthrough, made by yours truly... simply click the icons in the same order as they have been presented here... (Kudos to John who posted several solutions on Jay Is Games)

This walkthrough is compatible with version 1.56 (August 2010)


F U N  S P O I L E R S  A H E A D

Poor, Stupid and Ugly (Sandbox of God Walkthrough Part 2)

This is the sleaziest part of the game, in which humans eat all the rabbits and live in a barren desolated world... Using these walkthroughs takes away most of the fun in the game...

1.000.000 years BC, run rabbit run...

Tree Rabbits Man Wind Rain Meteor Earthquake Thunder Scorch

Year 1 AD, show them who's the boss...

Heat

Divine Intervention

Thunderstorm Gold Wind Freeze Holy Sign

Year 500 AD, plague those farmers...

Farmland Plague Gold Rest Rain

Year 1000 AD, being bored...

Thunderstorm Rest Holy Sign

Year 1500 AD, another plague...

Plague Silver Rest Thunder

Year 2000 AD, yet another plague...

Plague Rest

Year 2100 AD, much ado about nothing...

Rest

Playing this sequence gives you the worst god-rank and should bring the checklist to 73.60% (only if you played the previous walkthrough as well).
How to fulfill the other goals will be explained in the following days... if god, dog or blog doesn't forbid...


The complete SoG walkthroughs (updated August 2010):
Walking Through The Valley Of Eden (Sandbox of God Walkthrough Part 1) 
Bad Moon Rising (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 2) 
Under The Vulcano (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 3) 
I Want To Be A Little Fishy (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 4) 
It's the Final Countdown (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 5) 

Under The Vulcano (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 3)

Entry 294 posted in: c. The Sandbox Of God


Sandbox of God The Sandbox Of God really is an amazing game. By combining natural phenomena and godly interventions the inhabitants of Earth and their habitat evolve in different ways.

The game travels through 7 chapters, each representing a certain period of our Earth, starting in 1.000.000 years BC and ending in 2100 AD. Depending from the (previous and actual) situation several icons are shown on the screen. Clicking these will trigger some actions.

Some of these actions are pretty straightforward, it is obvious that rain will generate a forest out of a tree and that the same forest will nourish animals and humans, but how on Earth does one create a lake, a volcano or a cave out of a meteor?

The SoG website gave you some hints and then some other before but for those who don't want to experiment with all the settings in the game, or those who are really stuck, here is part 3 of the graphical walkthrough, made by yours truly... simply click the icons in the same order as they have been presented here... (Kudos to John who posted several solutions on Jay Is Games)

This walkthrough is compatible with version 1.56 (August 2010)


F U N  S P O I L E R S  A H E A D

Volcano, Rock City and Rabbitworld (Sandbox of God Walkthrough Part 3)

Men runs away from the erupting volcano and tries to settle down in the woods were the rabbits live. Playing by these walkthroughs takes away most of the fun in the game...

1.000.000 years BC, let's make a volcano...

Tree Rain Meteor Rabbits Earthquake

Divine Intervention

Thunder Scorch Man Wind

Year 1 AD, Rock City here we come...
Now the Volcano is a fact a new icon will appear.

Volcano Eruption Thunderstorm Holy Sign Heat

Do Nothing

Freeze Wind

Year 500 AD, farmland to help the humans...

Farmland Rain Rest

Divine Intervention

Gold Plague

Year 1000 AD, a code from heaven...
By the way, did you notice that the code from heaven looks a bit like an easter egg?
Update 2010: the easter eggs have been disabled in the 2010 version of the game.

Silver Holy Sign Thunderstorm Rest

Divine Intervention

Year 1500 AD, rabbitworld...

Silver Plague Thunder Rest

Divine Intervention

Year 2000 AD, let's get it over with...

Plague Medicine Rest

Year 2100 AD, the easy way out...

Rest

Playing this sequence after the two first walkthroughs will give you a small but necessary upgrade to 78.00%. Still a lot of empty spaces on the checklist though. How to fulfill these will be explained one of the the following days... if god, dog or blog doesn't forbid...


The complete SoG walkthroughs (updated August 2010):
Walking Through The Valley Of Eden (Sandbox of God Walkthrough Part 1) 
Bad Moon Rising (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 2) 
Under The Vulcano (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 3) 
I Want To Be A Little Fishy (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 4) 
It's the Final Countdown (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 5) 

20061004

I Want To Be A Little Fishy (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 4)

Entry 295 posted in: c. The Sandbox Of God


Sandbox of God The Sandbox Of God really is an amazing game. By combining natural phenomena and godly interventions the inhabitants of Earth and their habitat evolve in different ways.

The game travels through 7 chapters, each representing a certain period of our Earth, starting in 1.000.000 years BC and ending in 2100 AD. Depending from the (previous and actual) situation several icons are shown on the screen. Clicking these will trigger some actions.

Some of these actions are pretty straightforward, it is obvious that rain will generate a forest out of a tree and that the same forest will nourish animals and humans, but how on Earth does one create a lake, a volcano or a cave out of a meteor?

The SoG website gave you some hints and then some other before but for those who don't want to experiment with all the settings in the game, or those who are really stuck, here is part 4 of the graphical walkthrough, made by yours truly... simply click the icons in the same order as they have been presented here... (Kudos to John who posted several solutions on Jay Is Games)

This walkthrough is compatible with version 1.56 (August 2010)


F U N  S P O I L E R S  A H E A D

I Don't Like Fish (Sandbox of God Walkthrough Part 4)

The previous volcano scenario was spectacular for the eye but not for the points. This part will be a great leap forward towards the final and put your score at a staggering 91.20% (only if you have played the previous walkthroughs). Once again humans and rabbits both get civilised and learn to eat fishsticks. BTW, playing by these guides takes away most of the fun in the game...

1.000.000 years BC, the lake on the mountain...

Meteor Earthquake Tree Rain Rabbits Man

Divine Intervention

Scorch Thunder Wind

Year 1 AD, it's raining fish...
This scenario brings in a new icon...

Holy Sign Thunderstorm Fish Heat

Do Nothing

Freeze Wind

Year 500 AD, icy lake and business as usual...

Farmland Rain Rest

Divine Intervention

Gold Plague

Year 1000 AD, law and order...

Silver Holy Sign Rest

Divine Intervention

Thunderstorm

Year 1500 AD, rabbit village...

Oil Silver Plague Thunder Rest

Divine Intervention

Year 2000 AD, almost done...

Medicine Rest Plague

Year 2100 AD, that's it...

Rest


The complete SoG walkthroughs (updated August 2010):
Walking Through The Valley Of Eden (Sandbox of God Walkthrough Part 1) 
Bad Moon Rising (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 2) 
Under The Vulcano (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 3) 
I Want To Be A Little Fishy (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 4) 
It's the Final Countdown (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 5) 

20061006

It's the Final Countdown (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 5)

Entry 296 posted in: c. The Sandbox Of God


Sandbox of God The Sandbox Of God really is an amazing game. By combining natural phenomena and godly interventions the inhabitants of Earth and their habitat evolve in different ways.

The game travels through 7 chapters, each representing a certain period of our Earth, starting in 1.000.000 years BC and ending in 2100 AD. Depending from the (previous and actual) situation several icons are shown on the screen. Clicking these will trigger some actions.

Some of these actions are pretty straightforward, it is obvious that rain will generate a forest out of a tree and that the same forest will nourish animals and humans, but how on Earth does one create a lake, a volcano or a cave out of a meteor?

The SoG website gave you some hints and then some other before but for those who don't want to experiment with all the settings in the game, or those who are really stuck, here is the last part of the graphical walkthrough, made by yours truly... simply click the icons in the same order as they have been presented here... (Kudos to John who posted several solutions on Jay Is Games)

This walkthrough is compatible with version 1.56 (August 2010)


F U N  S P O I L E R S  A H E A D

War! What Is it Good For? (Sandbox of God Walkthrough Part 5)

This is the most boring scenario of the game, as it is needs exactly the same moves from walkthrough part1 but with a little twist at the end.

1.000.000 years BC, the coming of man... and rabbits...

Earthquake Tree Man Rain Meteor Rabbits Thunder

Divine Intervention

Scorch Wind

Year 1 AD, the gold it's in the...

Holy Sign Thunderstorm Heat

Do Nothing

Freeze Gold Wind

Year 500 AD, farms, plagues and things...

Farmland Rain Gold Rest

Divine Intervention

Plague

Year 1000 AD, have catapult, will shoot...

Holy Sign Catapult Silver Rest

Divine Intervention

Thunderstorm

Year 1500 AD, oil to boil...

Oil Thunder Silver Rest

Divine Intervention

Plague

Year 2000 AD, the diesel age...
A new icon appears and is best used at once.

Fuel Medicine Rest Plague

Year 2100 AD, kill, kill, kill...

Rest Peace

Game over. 100%.


The complete SoG walkthroughs (updated August 2010):
Walking Through The Valley Of Eden (Sandbox of God Walkthrough Part 1) 
Bad Moon Rising (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 2) 
Under The Vulcano (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 3) 
I Want To Be A Little Fishy (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 4) 
It's the Final Countdown (Sandbox Of God Walkthrough Part 5) 

20061015

The Rough Guide To Pink Floyd

Entry 297 posted in: 5. The Pink Thing


Pink Floyd fans have been diminished to a bunch of pathetic wankers if you ask me. I know, I am one of them. We discuss the fact if Syd Barrett was having an Earl Grey or an Orange Pekoe tea on Sunday morning the 18th of November of the year 1967 and we are proud of that.

You slowly become a Pink Floyd wanker (PFW for short) when one realizes that the amount of Pink Floyd tribute CDs starts to become bigger than the volume of official Pink Floyd albums. Magazines with Pink Floyd on the cover make a pile higher than the house you are living in and you have just bought The Rough Guide To Pink Floyd only because you want to scrutinize it for possible errors.

Being a grumpy wanker de luxe I am fairly disappointed in Toby Manning's The Rough Guide To Pink Floyd, because it actually is a very fine book. I like it, damn! I like the air of blasphemous criticism it breathes throughout the text, the fine humour, the stabs at all the (past) members of the band. This is by no way a hagiography. Aren't there any errors, "Show me the errors!", I hear you scream. Well probably they are in there, but I have already forgotten them, so much fun I had by reading The Story section of book.

'Cause the book is divided in 3 segments: The Story, The Music and Floydology. The Story takes about half of the volume and is a very good read. The Music tries to delve inside the productive qualities of the Floyd members and this is where some favouritism creeps in. Finally.

Over the years we have had several Which One Is Pink wars. There are still people around who think that the post-Barrett-era band does not have the rights to the name Pink Floyd. Most of those bozos would never have heard of Syd Barrett anyway without the tributes that have been buried inside Dark Side of The Moon, Wish You Were Here or The Wall, so their claims are not to be taken too seriously.

Of more importance are the Waters versus Gilmour feuds. Toby Manning has a fine point when he writes that The Final Cut is a Roger Waters solo record disguised as a Floyd release, while The Pros And Cons Of Hitchhiking is in fact a 'Pink Floyd album in all but personnel'. He certainly has the right to his opinion that post-1986 Diet Floyd was a fine forgery of the classic original. However, I do not understand that the author selects only one representative track from the post-Waters-period: Richard Wright's lament Wearing The Inside Out. That track is, by definition, not representative for the post-Waters Floyd at all and if the slightly horrible The Post-War Dream, Your Possible Pasts and Not Now John made it into his Pink Floyd Top 50, I fail to see why One Slip, Sorrow, What Do You Want From Me or High Hopes have not been included as well.

But even if Toby Manning is an erring admirer of the opposite camp he has probably written the best book about the Floyd in ages. It can stand without shame next to Nicholas Schaffner's Saucerful Of Secrets (1991, already) and Nick Mason's Inside Out memories (2004).

Wanking one last time: the 18th November of the year 1967 wasn't a Sunday after all!


If you liked this post - you might be interested in this one as well: Fasten your anoraks! 

20061018

This Satanic Trip

Entry 298 posted in: 2. DNA


OK, I admit. I am in my Douglas Adams period. During those periods all that I touch, all that I see, all that I taste, and all I feel circles around DNA. However, you have to admit, the man was a genius. But also a shrewd entrepreneur.

He made Hitchhiker radio shows (on the air, on vinyl, on CD and even on DVD), books, comics, a computer game, a television show, a (rather bad) movie, and even a towel. The man did not only look like one but was also a mogul of good taste. He even played on stage with Pink Floyd. For his birthday. Just like that. What you gonna do for your birthday? Oh, I think I will jam a bit with Pink Floyd in a room with 30,000 spectators. Should be fun.

Of course it was a fine designed master plan. Nearly every sidestep in one of his novels can be extrapolated into a new adventure. And thus the novel Life, the Universe and Everything, whose title was, by the way, taken out of one of his other books, contained a sentence that become the plot for yet another one, other than the first other, if you can still follow me on this trip through Adams's parallel paradise.

Starship Titanic, or fully titled, Douglas Adams's Starship Titanic, was not written by DNA, but was commissioned by him to a parrot, not a dead parrot of course, but a living one. Terry Jones, who used to be a full Monty Python in his glory days, did the deed.

So far for the introduction. Now for the book. What could be better then to quote a bit?

"Yarktak, Edembop, Raguliten, Desembo, Luntparger, Forzab, Kakit, Zimwiddy, Duterprat, Kazitinker-Rigipitil, Purzenhakken, Roofcleetop, Spanglowiddin, Buke-Hammadorf, Bunzlywotter, Brudelhampon, Harzimwodl, Unctimpoter, Golholiwol, Dinseynewt, Tidoloft, Cossimiwip, Onecrocodil, Erklehammerdrat, Inchbewigglit, Samiliftodft, Buke-Willinujit..."

You may have guessed it; it is full of aliens. Some of them even have sex with an Earth specimen, and that goes a bit like this: "It sounded as if they might have been playing polo, or doing a bit of water-skiing all mixed in with some pretty serious weight-lifting. "

Not bad at all.

The best part of the book is saved till the end. It is a picture. Of the author. Sitting in front of his bookcase. Laptop on his lap. Naked.

By the way: Starship Titanic is also a computer game. Not a towel... yet...


If you liked this post - you might be interested in this one as well: Gentle Ghosts 

Penumbra Overture Website

Entry 299 posted in: 3. Gamebits


The gothic horror demo Penumbra was so excellent that the makers have decided to go commercial. Three episodes are planned, costing 19.99 Euro each.

The hype can be followed at Penumbra Overture.


If you liked this post - you might be interested in this one as well: Nomen Est Omen: Starship Titanic

20061029

Nomen Est Omen: Starship Titanic

Entry 300 posted in: 2. DNA, 3. Gamebits


Having read the Douglas Adams novel  that was actually written by Terry Jones, from Monty Python fame, I found that it was about time to titillate my visual sensor systems and to play the game that listens to the same title: Starship Titanic.

I remember the game well, around the year 2000 it was lying in heaps in the sales bin of a local CD shop, that also happened to sell some software and videos of girls in various stadia of nakedness, and perhaps due to the fact that nobody knew what this shop was actually selling it went bankrupt after a while. Therefore, I never had the chance to buy the Starship Titanic box, which apparently contained some 3D-glasses that do not come handy at all in playing the game.

Lucky for me I could take a space-cab to the nearest parallel universe were time stood still at 1998 and where I could get hold of one of those goodies. I realize this may not be all together legal at this mirror side of ZZ 9 plural Z alpha but who cares. The day some person or thing will bring the box out again, I will buy it, paying with real zilch, promised.

So after installing the game and browsing the net to find that particular Cinepak codec to make the game run under Window XP Service Pack 2, I placed myself in front of my flatscreen and pressed the Starship Titanic icon. The game is strange, so strange it took me two ctrl-alt-del sessions to understand that this was how the game was supposed to start. I was quite baffled by the touchdown of the ship and the movie that followed it. So I prepared for a strange, interesting and hilarious adventure...

Meatloaf once vociferously expressed that 'two out of three ain't bad', but in this case I can't totally agree. Although the game promises to have a graphical interface it really is just an upgraded text adventure with some simple click and point interaction. The screen doesn't give you the first person free movement environment as promised (although the Wolfenstein 3D engine was invented seven years before that, in 1991) but consists of a multitude of slides with hotpoint triggers and a visual effect to imitate some action from one view to another. These visual effects have been programmed into 446 AVI files, so there is really a lot to watch, but it starts getting tedious after a while anyway as 'moving around' inside a room isn't always as simple and easy as it looks. In order to solve a puzzle, some objects lying on the floor have to be taken but due to the fact that the right slide has to be triggered before this can be done this becomes a rather frustrating experience. The same goes for finding the right elevator, the right corridor, the right room... (That click and point games don't need to be boring was already proven by Lucasarts in 1993 with Days of the Tentacle: Tentacle Day.)

Douglas Adams was a storyteller and the Starship Titanic novel proves there was an - albeit rather flimsy - story to tell. That story gets completely lost in the game. It starts promising enough with the introduction by the doorbot after the ship has demolished your house (again an AVI movie), but after that you are on your own... Early in the game you find a dead body and it is left to your imagination to find out who this is, who has killed him and why, why he is carrying these goodies, etc... An attempt is made when you find the logins and passwords of the mailboxes of the dead guy, but reading through a dozen of 'mails' is a typical text adventure solution and not apt for a graphical game. (The Starfleet Academy adventure from 1995 featured 'live' video-messages from Captain James T. Kirk, Captain Hikaru Sulu and Chekov to help you through your missions.)

Nearly at the end of the game you have to resuscitate the ship's main computer, called Titania, and this robotic creature gabbers nearly for five minutes without the possibility to shut her up. While she is explaining what has happened to the ship and who may be responsible for all this and why she thinks you should take the helm and lead us back to Earth in order to find that Leovinus fellow back who has probably jumped off the ship while it crash-landed the only thing you can think of is that it was a big mistake to wake her up to begin with.

Douglas Adams himself can be seen two times in the game, once as the enthusiast author ordering us to hurry up with the game (a237.avi), the second time as Leovinus (a113.avi) in something that can be defined as being the most boring epilogue for a game ever. It's the description of the game in a nutshell, I can only deduct that somewhere during the development of the software the creators must have lost the interest (or the money).

It's a pity, because the conversation engine that can handle more than 5000 situations and contains, apparently, 10000+ sentences is a real treat. Ask about The Beatles, about Monty Python, about Douglas Adams, 42, Life, the Universe and Everything, the maximum air velocity of an unladen swallow and you'll get some very daft answers.

Forget the game - just keep talking to the bots, that is were the fun is...


If you liked this post - you might be interested in this one as well: This Satanic Trip